Poachers Responsible for Karnataka, India Tiger Losses

karnataka tigers

The Deccan Chronicle has reported that 23 tigers have died over the past two years in Karnataka, an Indian state known for having the largest population of tigers in the country. According to the National Tiger Conservation Authority, poaching is the main cause of the loss.

“Of the tigers who died at least 16 are said to have been fallen into the hands of  poachers or  succumbed to “unknown reasons.”   While eight tigers died or were poached in the tiger reserves,  six  were found dead outside them. Although as many as 14 tigers died in 2012 alone, the state has done little to curb wildlife poaching, say animal conservationists.”

Read more about the Karnataka tigers.
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Today, July 29th, is Global Tiger Day

the tiger

Today, July 29th, is Global Tiger Day, also known as International Tiger Day. The purpose of the event, which was launched in 2010 at the world’s first global Tiger Summit in St. Petersburg, Russia, is to raise awareness on tiger conservation issues.

The 2010 St. Petersburg Tiger Summit was organized by Russian president Vladimir Putin and World Bank chief Robert Zoellick in response to research that showed wild tigers would go extinct by 2040 or sooner.

Summit goals included the establishment of a global system to preserve and restore tigers in the borders of their historical range, increase public awareness and support for tiger conservation and double the wild tiger population by 2022, from an estimated 3,200 wild tiger to more than 7,000.

More than $330 million in donor pledges was raised during the summit, which was attended by hundreds of representatives from the 13 tiger range states and members of the Global Tiger Initiative (GTI), as well as the WWF, Wildlife Conservation Society, political leaders, heads of state and celebrities such as Leonardo DiCaprio and Naomi Campbell. The group unanimously adopted the St. Petersburg Declaration on Tiger Conservation, and endorsed the Global Tiger Recovery Program as the mechanism for its implementation.

Established in 2008, the Global Tiger Initiative (GTI) is an international alliance of governments, organizations and individuals led by the 13 tiger range countries. GTI members are committed to working together toward a common agenda to save wild tigers from extinction.

GTI aspires “…to a world where, by 2022, wild tigers across Asia will no longer face the risk of extinction—and will live in healthy populations within high conservation value landscapes that are managed sustainably for present and future generations.”

 

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Indonesia’s Sumatran Tiger Dangerously Close to Extinction

Sumatran Tiger

The Sumatran tiger, found only on the island of Sumatra in Indonesia, is a critically endangered big cat.  There are currently less than 400 of these rare and beautiful animals living in the wild.

At the time of the 1973 ratification of the Convention of International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), there were approximately 1000 Sumatran tigers in existence.  Despite Indonesia’s efforts to protect this rare and beautiful animal, the Sumatran tiger population has continued to decline due to loss of habitat, poaching and snares.

Sumatran tigers can live for up to 15 years in the wild. Approximately 100 years ago, there were three subspecies of Indonesian tiger, the Javan Tiger, Bali tiger and Sumatran tiger.  Both the Javan and Bali tiger are now extinct.

The Sumatran Tiger Trust is aggressively working to protect the tiger from extinction.  All of the proceeds donated to this group go directly to Sumatran tiger conservation.

You can read an Op Ed on Sumatran tiger conservation published by the JakartaGlobe here.

Sumatra Map

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