Jaguars Seduced by Calvin Klein “Obsession for Men” Cologne

calvin klein obsession for men

According to a recent article in Scientific American, the best way to lure a jaguar to a camera trap is by spraying the surrounding tree branches with Calvin Klein’s “Obsession for Men” cologne.

The camera traps are used to take photos of the jaguars and collect research data. When a jaguar approaches the trap, infrared sensors trigger the camera.

“Obsession for Men” is described by the manufacturer as a “masculine blend of botanics, spices and rare woods.” One of the scent’s main ingredients is civetone, which is produced from the glands of civets.

The civet, a nocturnal cat-like mammal with raccoon facial features, lives in the tropical forests of Asia and Africa. There are over a dozen different civet species. The civet Viverra civettina is listed as Critically Endangered on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

civet

The animal’s gland secretions have been used to make perfume for hundreds of years. However, the number of perfumes containing civetone has been on the decline since the development of synthetic musk. Channel No. 5 stopped using civet in their perfumes in 1998.

The procedure for removing the secretion, which is extracted every two to three weeks from a sac under the civet’s tail, is extremely painful.

In 2004, the Chinese government killed over 10,000 civet cats in captivity when a man became ill from a new strain of the SARS virus that was similar to the SARS virus found in civets.

In addition to the use of glandular sections to manufacture perfume, civets are also killed for their meat, which is considered a delicacy in Asia.

A coffee made in Vietnam and the Philippines is produced from coffee cherries that have been partially digested by civets. A 2012 investigation found civets being force-fed the cherries and living in horrific conditions.

Are you or someone you know using perfume or cologne with civetone? You may want to start shopping for another product. Check the bottle’s ingredients to find out.

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Two Iberian Lynx Cubs Released into the Wild

Iberian lynx cub

On June 21, 2013, two Iberian lynx cubs born at the Silves reproduction centre in southern Portugal were released in the Guarrizas valley (Spain) after being taught to hunt and survive in the wilderness. To date, 19 cubs (11 from Silves) have been reintroduced to their natural habitat.

The Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus), also called the Pardel lynx and Spanish lynx, is a small wild cat, and listed as Critically Endangered on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. According to the IUCN, several years ago there were less than 150 adult Iberian lynx in existence, spread between two breeding populations in southwestern Spain. Today, there is currently a population of approximately 300 Iberian lynx living in the wild. There are also reports of a small population of cats in Portugal.

iberian lynx

Iberian Lynx – Photo Credit -www.lynxexsitu.es

Factors contributing to the Iberian lynx decline include the loss of prey (rabbits) due to disease and over-hunting, habitat destruction, poaching, poisoning, feral dogs and getting hit by vehicles.

A national action plan for the conservation of the Iberian lynx was created in 2007 with several goals, including preserving habitat for both the lynx and its prey, reducing non-natural reasons for mortality, creating a captive breeding center and raising awareness about the cat’s conservation status. Various organizations are now working to prevent the cat’s extinction.

Like other species of lynx, the Iberian lynx has a short tail, fur under the chin and strands of hair on the ears. It is smaller than its lynx relatives, and has a more noticeable, darker looking coat with spots. At one point in time, the Iberian lynx roamed throughout the entire Iberian Peninsula, an area of land that currently includes parts of France, Spain, Portugal, Andorra and Gibraltar. Although rabbits are the cats main prey, the Iberian lynx will has also been known to hunt ducks, deer, rodents, reptiles and amphibians.

You can read the entire article about the cubs here.

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Lion and Tiger Corridors in India

national - geo - leopard-philly-zoo

An article from National Geographic on the importance of lion and tiger corridors in India.

“Every day, little by little, our species is creating new islands. These are not islands in the sea. They are patches of forest, grassland, mountainside, and swamp that encompass what remains of the wild. Unlike islands dotted across the sea, though, there are sometimes pathways between these protected swaths that permit organisms to traverse the small percentage of their range that remains open to habitation. In the case of central India’s tigers and leopards, these wildlife corridors are critical for survival.”

You can read the entire story here.

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Gujarat: Home of the Endangered Asiatic Lion

endangered asiatic lion

The Asiatic lion is an endangered lion subspecies that inhabits Gujarat (The Land of the Legends), a state in India. There are currently less than 500 Asiatic lions in existence.  Only 13 Asiatic lions were in existence in 1907, when an Indian prince banned hunting the lions.

In 1965, the Gujarat’s Gir National Park and Gir National Sanctuary began protecting the lion to prevent its extinction. Today, the Pania Sanctuary, Girnar Sanctuary and Mitiyala Sanctuary also provide a safe haven for the lion.

According to an article in Scientific American, the Asiatic lions have so far been saved from extinction, but are now outgrowing their safe environment and facing new survival issues.

“…the lions themselves are killed or injured when they come into contact with crude, deadly electric fences built around farms or fall in any of the tens of thousands of roughly hewn open wells in the region.”

The Wildlife Conservation Trust of India’s Asiatic lion website has detailed information on the lion, including statistics, habitat and conservation data. The group is also involved in the Sakkarbaug Zoo Asiatic lion breeding program.

REFERENCE:
Map of Gujarat in India

Asiatic Lion Photo Credit: Gangasudhan at en.wikipedia

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