Russians Get Tiger Conservation Training in India

russian team traiing to protect tigers

TIGER NEWS ROUNDUP – FEATURED STORY

Russian forest officers are participating in India’s “Tiger Watch Programme,” a partnership between the International Fund for Animal Welfare-Wildlife Trust of India and Global Tiger Forum. More than half of the world’s wild tiger population inhabits India.

“…in Russia forest officers may sometimes go a considerably long duration or even their entire career without actually seeing a tiger in the wild, given the sparse population in the ranges…”

Russian team being trained in Panna to boost tiger conservation
Times of India
NAGPUR: In a bid to boost tiger conservation efforts globally, International Fund for Animal Welfare-Wildlife Trust of India (IFAW-WTI) in collaboration with the Global Tiger Forum (GTF) has hosted a two-member team of Russian forest officers in India and more »


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Poachers Responsible for Karnataka, India Tiger Losses

karnataka tigers

The Deccan Chronicle has reported that 23 tigers have died over the past two years in Karnataka, an Indian state known for having the largest population of tigers in the country. According to the National Tiger Conservation Authority, poaching is the main cause of the loss.

“Of the tigers who died at least 16 are said to have been fallen into the hands of  poachers or  succumbed to “unknown reasons.”   While eight tigers died or were poached in the tiger reserves,  six  were found dead outside them. Although as many as 14 tigers died in 2012 alone, the state has done little to curb wildlife poaching, say animal conservationists.”

Read more about the Karnataka tigers.
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Asiatic Lion Relocation: Gujarat Fights To Keep Lions

asiatic lion

The Asiatic lion (Panthera leo persica) is a subspecies which currently lives only in the Gir Forest of Gujarat. INDRANIL MUKHERJEE/AFP/Getty Images.

On April 15th, 2013, the Supreme Court of India issued a ruling that some of the Asiatic lions living in the state of Gujarat must be relocated to Madhya Pradesh within six months.  Gujarat is now appealing the ruling. Supporters of the move say that the Gujarat population of Asiatic lions has grown too large for the area. They also believe that relocation could minimize the dangers of having the last remaining Asiatic population in one location.  Gujarat is challenging the ruling with new research data that shows the existing lions are spread out over many more miles than previously thought. State representatives also claim that the relocation of large carnivores over the years has been unsuccessful.

The Asiatic lion is a big cat and listed as “endangered’ on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

Read the full article here.

 

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Lion and Tiger Corridors in India

national - geo - leopard-philly-zoo

An article from National Geographic on the importance of lion and tiger corridors in India.

“Every day, little by little, our species is creating new islands. These are not islands in the sea. They are patches of forest, grassland, mountainside, and swamp that encompass what remains of the wild. Unlike islands dotted across the sea, though, there are sometimes pathways between these protected swaths that permit organisms to traverse the small percentage of their range that remains open to habitation. In the case of central India’s tigers and leopards, these wildlife corridors are critical for survival.”

You can read the entire story here.

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Gujarat: Home of the Endangered Asiatic Lion

endangered asiatic lion

The Asiatic lion is an endangered lion subspecies that inhabits Gujarat (The Land of the Legends), a state in India. There are currently less than 500 Asiatic lions in existence.  Only 13 Asiatic lions were in existence in 1907, when an Indian prince banned hunting the lions.

In 1965, the Gujarat’s Gir National Park and Gir National Sanctuary began protecting the lion to prevent its extinction. Today, the Pania Sanctuary, Girnar Sanctuary and Mitiyala Sanctuary also provide a safe haven for the lion.

According to an article in Scientific American, the Asiatic lions have so far been saved from extinction, but are now outgrowing their safe environment and facing new survival issues.

“…the lions themselves are killed or injured when they come into contact with crude, deadly electric fences built around farms or fall in any of the tens of thousands of roughly hewn open wells in the region.”

The Wildlife Conservation Trust of India’s Asiatic lion website has detailed information on the lion, including statistics, habitat and conservation data. The group is also involved in the Sakkarbaug Zoo Asiatic lion breeding program.

REFERENCE:
Map of Gujarat in India

Asiatic Lion Photo Credit: Gangasudhan at en.wikipedia

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