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Big cats and small wild cats conservation, education and organizations. International wild cat conservation directory. Big cat species articles, research, news, pictures and videos; endangered big cats information, list of big cats, small wild cats and wild cat conservation groups worldwide.

The Endangered Fishing Cat

the fishing cat

The fishing cat is small wild cat that lives in southern Asia wetlands near streams, marshes and rivers. They are agile and excellent swimmers, and can even swim under water.

Male fishing cats weigh approximately 25 lbs., with the females weighing around 15 lbs. As for their physical appearance, they have a stocky body and short legs. Their fur is olive-gray with black stripes and spots. In addition to eating fish, the cat’s diet also includes small mammals, birds and reptiles.

The fishing cat is listed as Endangered on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. The cat’s declining population is due to habitat loss. Find out about groups involved in fishing cat conservation here.

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Two Iberian Lynx Cubs Released into the Wild

Iberian lynx cub

On June 21, 2013, two Iberian lynx cubs born at the Silves reproduction centre in southern Portugal were released in the Guarrizas valley (Spain) after being taught to hunt and survive in the wilderness. To date, 19 cubs (11 from Silves) have been reintroduced to their natural habitat.

The Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus), also called the Pardel lynx and Spanish lynx, is a small wild cat, and listed as Critically Endangered on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. According to the IUCN, several years ago there were less than 150 adult Iberian lynx in existence, spread between two breeding populations in southwestern Spain. Today, there is currently a population of approximately 300 Iberian lynx living in the wild. There are also reports of a small population of cats in Portugal.

iberian lynx

Iberian Lynx – Photo Credit -www.lynxexsitu.es

Factors contributing to the Iberian lynx decline include the loss of prey (rabbits) due to disease and over-hunting, habitat destruction, poaching, poisoning, feral dogs and getting hit by vehicles.

A national action plan for the conservation of the Iberian lynx was created in 2007 with several goals, including preserving habitat for both the lynx and its prey, reducing non-natural reasons for mortality, creating a captive breeding center and raising awareness about the cat’s conservation status. Various organizations are now working to prevent the cat’s extinction.

Like other species of lynx, the Iberian lynx has a short tail, fur under the chin and strands of hair on the ears. It is smaller than its lynx relatives, and has a more noticeable, darker looking coat with spots. At one point in time, the Iberian lynx roamed throughout the entire Iberian Peninsula, an area of land that currently includes parts of France, Spain, Portugal, Andorra and Gibraltar. Although rabbits are the cats main prey, the Iberian lynx will has also been known to hunt ducks, deer, rodents, reptiles and amphibians.

You can read the entire article about the cubs here.

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Asiatic Lion Relocation: Gujarat Fights To Keep Lions

asiatic lion

The Asiatic lion (Panthera leo persica) is a subspecies which currently lives only in the Gir Forest of Gujarat. INDRANIL MUKHERJEE/AFP/Getty Images.

On April 15th, 2013, the Supreme Court of India issued a ruling that some of the Asiatic lions living in the state of Gujarat must be relocated to Madhya Pradesh within six months.  Gujarat is now appealing the ruling. Supporters of the move say that the Gujarat population of Asiatic lions has grown too large for the area. They also believe that relocation could minimize the dangers of having the last remaining Asiatic population in one location.  Gujarat is challenging the ruling with new research data that shows the existing lions are spread out over many more miles than previously thought. State representatives also claim that the relocation of large carnivores over the years has been unsuccessful.

The Asiatic lion is a big cat and listed as “endangered’ on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

Read the full article here.

 

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Indonesia’s Sumatran Tiger Dangerously Close to Extinction

Sumatran Tiger

The Sumatran tiger, found only on the island of Sumatra in Indonesia, is a critically endangered big cat.  There are currently less than 400 of these rare and beautiful animals living in the wild.

At the time of the 1973 ratification of the Convention of International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), there were approximately 1000 Sumatran tigers in existence.  Despite Indonesia’s efforts to protect this rare and beautiful animal, the Sumatran tiger population has continued to decline due to loss of habitat, poaching and snares.

Sumatran tigers can live for up to 15 years in the wild. Approximately 100 years ago, there were three subspecies of Indonesian tiger, the Javan Tiger, Bali tiger and Sumatran tiger.  Both the Javan and Bali tiger are now extinct.

The Sumatran Tiger Trust is aggressively working to protect the tiger from extinction.  All of the proceeds donated to this group go directly to Sumatran tiger conservation.

You can read an Op Ed on Sumatran tiger conservation published by the JakartaGlobe here.

Sumatra Map

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Jaguarundi Sighting in Pioneer Town

“…three of us watched mesmerised out of our caravan window as a jaguarundi drank water from a bird bath at a
remote desert camp near Pioneer Town. The animal calmly wandered off completely aware of our presence to sit some 40 meters away on its hind quarters to watch the sun set.

Just gorgeous.

Took us some time to identify it with certainty but only because we didn’t know of the existence of this beautiful quiet feline.

Sighting time and date Tuesday 11th June about 20 minutes after sunset just after 9pm. Location – a Californian secret but happy to tell researchers if important or significant

There were indistinct prints from the birdbath to the mound but none photographable, each print was about 1.5 inches to 2inches across.

I looked for traces of fur in the cacti and vegetation but found none.

When the animal moved on it dropped low on all fours and moving rapidly slunk into vegetation to disappear in seconds.

Total viewing was around four minutes.

Fur was almost a crimson brown and appeared uniform, tail was almost as long as the body and very fluffy.

Animal looked to weigh thirty pounds or so. Much smaller than a mountain lion and lower to the ground with an angular almost pointy
face.

Unbelievable experience!”

P.H.

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