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Bring Back The Florida Panthers

- center for biological diversity

There are fewer than 180 Florida panthers left in the wild.

Florida panthers once roamed throughout the Southeast, but today they’re restricted to less than 5 percent of their historic range in a single population in South Florida. Recovery has been slow, but there have been gains. Today there are an estimated 100 to 180 wild panthers — up from just a dozen or so in the early 1970s. These panthers, however, continue to face numerous threats due to our increasing human population and relentless development. And it’s sickening, but dozens of these cats are still lost each year to collisions with cars.

Sign the BRING BACK THE FLORIDA PANTHERS petition.

News Source: Center for Biological Diversity
Image Source: Center for Biological Diversity

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Blood Lions – The Canned Hunting Industry Exposed

canned lion hunting

This film exposes the ugly truth behind South Africa’s canned lion hunting industry. It will premiere at the Durban International Film Festival on July 22, 2015.

In South Africa there are some 10,000 lions and the numbers are increasing all the time. But the lie behind this statistic is revealed in the fact that South Africa is the only lion range state that has three separate classifications for these great cats: captive, managed and wild. And so we find that only 3,000 – less than a third – are truly wild and living in designated conservation areas.


Read more at: http://www.dailymaverick.co.za/article/2015-07-14-blood-lions-the-film-that-blows-the-brutal-lid-off-the-canned-hunting-industry/#.VaUpKnzbK00

News Source:  Daily Maverick
Image Source: Daily Maverick

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New Report – 10 Asiatic Lions Killed in June 2015 Floods

10 Asiatic lions killed in flood

According to a new report, 10 Asiatic lions and dozens of people were killed last month by monsoon flooding in Gujarat, India.

The report, submitted this weekend to the state and federal environment ministries, said the rains also killed at least 10 of the country’s 523 lions — the last members of the subspecies left anywhere in the wild — as well as prey animals including more than 80 spotted deer and 1,670 Asian antelope called blue bulls…The lions’ deaths occurred in two badly flooded areas near the lion sanctuary in Gir National Forest in southern Gujarat. Other lions were found in “weak health and shocked condition” and were given treatment and food supplements, the report said, according to the Press Trust of India.

Source:  www.torontosun.com
Photo Credit: www.torontosun.com
Read more at http://www.torontosun.com/2015/07/12/monsoon-floods-in-india-killed-10-endangered-asiatic-lions-officials

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New Asiatic Lions Documentary

asiatic lion documentary

On July 6, 2015 the Discovery Channel premiered a new Asiatic lion documentary “India’s Wandering Lions”. The lions were tracked and filmed for over 3 years.

 Today, the Indian lion population has rebounded to a population of over 400 – a cause for celebration. However, their success has surpassed the natural capacity of the Gir Forest Sanctuary, forcing lions to spill over its borders and seek new homes. Can they remain out of trouble and keep their human neighbours onside for the long term? We have worked with Kosmik Global, Earth Touch and Discovery India to bring this incredible story to light. With unprecedented access by locals and the various forest departments, we have uncovered one of the most extraordinary stories of recovery of our generation. Our 4K cameras bring a beautiful richness and clarity to the imagery, while colour starlight and hi-res thermal techniques allow us to create striking images, day or night.

 

 

Photo Credits: Featured Image/IndiaToday.com

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Saving the Iberian Lynx

Portugal Makes History - Iberian Lynx

Last month, a pair of Iberian lynxes were reintroduced into the wild in Portugal. The reintroduction took place in the Guadiana Valley Natural Park, which is located in the southeastern part of the country. This is the first time the small wild cat has been released in Portugal. Several previous releases and reintroductions took place in Spain.

One of the cats came from Portugal’s Silves Conservation Center and the other from central Spain. Each cat was marked before it was released. After reintroduction, the cats are permanently monitored.

The Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus) is native to the Iberian Peninsula, a 225,000 square mile area of the land that includes Spain, Portugal and Andorra, along with sub-territories of France and Britain.

Like other lynxes, the Iberian lynx has a short tail, long legs, tufted ears and fur projecting around the neck area that looks like a beard.

The cat’s preferred habitat is scrub (woody plants and small trees) and its primary prey (90%) is rabbit.

The Iberian lynx is listed as Critically Endangered by several organizations, including the IUCN.  At one point, there were less than 100 Iberian lynxes in the wild and only two breeding populations. The population decline has been caused by loss of habitat, loss of prey and disease.

Iberian lynxAccording to a recent story in The Portugal News, a National Pact for the Conservation of the Iberian Lynx was signed in 2014 with 20 land-owners, researchers and non-governmental organizations.

Two thousand hectares (approximately 5000 acres) of land were secured for the first reintroduction into Portugal, and “more negotiations are taking place to at least double the amount of land.”

In 2013, a study published in the Nature Climate Change journal concluded that even with successful reintroduction programs, the Iberian lynx may become extinct by 2050 due to climate change.

Do you think the Iberian lynx can be saved from extinction? For more information, visit SOS Lynx.

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Cheetahs – The New Luxury Pet in the Middle East

Owning cheetahs - a status symbol in the Middle East

Owning a cheetah has become a status symbol in the Middle East, according to the Convention on the Trade in Endangered Species (CITES), who warns their popularity as a “hot new luxury pet” is putting wild cheetah populations at greater risk – and possibly extinction.

People are paying as much as $10,000 for cubs. There has also been an increasing demand for cheetah-skin shoes.

Many of these cheetah “pets” have been illegally smuggled into the country from Somalia. Up to 70% of the cubs die before reaching the Middle East.

There are currently less than 10,000 cheetahs living in the wild – a 90% decline in population over the past 100 years.

Sources:
Extinction fears rise as cheetah becomes new luxury pet in Middle East” (Delhi Daily News)
Cheetah smuggling driving wild population to extinction, report says” (The Guardian)

 

 

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Mark Your Calendar – July 29th is Global Tiger Day

Tiger with Cub - Global Tiger Day July 29

On July 29th, Global Tiger Day will be celebrated worldwide. Wild tiger populations have declined over 90% in the past 100 years. It is estimated that less that 3000 tigers currently live in the wild. Several tiger subspecies are already extinct.

Tigers have been relentlessly killed for their skins and body parts. Tiger “farms” are now being run to breed the cats for slaughter.

How can you help? Spread the word about Global Tiger Day and sign the new Avaaz petition against tiger farms in China.

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India’s National Tiger Conservation Authority asks for Tiger Radio-Collars

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via Conservation India/Economic Times

Due to the man-tiger conflict in the state, India’s National Tiger Conservation Authority (NTCA) has directed Uttar Pradesh, the country’s fifth largest state, to identify “potential” man-eaters and radio-collar tigers to track their movement.

 

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New Camera Trap Images of an Amur Leopard with Cubs

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News Source: ALTA Conservation – Amazing News from China

ALTA CONSERVATION: Wildlife Conservation Society’s Jon Slaght has sent us this blog update with incredible news from China:

FIRST DOCUMENTATION OF AMUR LEOPARD REPRODUCTION IN CHINA!

On October 9th 2013, video camera traps set by the Forestry Bureau of Jilin Province in the Wangqing Nature Reserve in northeast China recorded footage of a female Amur leopard with two cubs. This is the first known record of breeding by this critically endangered cat in China, and demonstrates that Jilin Province, long thought to be peripheral habitat used only by transient leopards coming from Russia, is supporting a breeding population of these incredible cats.

The cameras were set as part of a long-term, region-wide tiger and leopard monitoring program overseen by the Forestry Bureau of Jilin Province. The Wildlife Conservation Society’s China Program, with support from ALTA, has provided technical and financial assistance to this project. Other partners in this project include World Wildlife Fund, the Feline Center of the State Forestry Administration, and the Chinese Academy of Sciences.

This important discovery underscores the need for increased conservation efforts in the region, where leopards are threatened by poaching and loss of habitat.

Photo copyright Forestry Bureau of Jilin Province:

The post Amazing news from China appeared first on ALTA Conservation.

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